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Bumper Crop of Opioid Overdoses

Afghan Opium Production

Bumper Crop of Opioid Overdoses. Across the United States for opioid addicts there is a bumper crop of overdoses. An opioid overdose occurs every 11 minutes, which translates into 5 an hour, 120 a day, 840 a week, 3,600 a month and 43,200 a year.

 

These statistics are alarming to us, but they are not a deterrence to the addicts. The surgeon general advised that civilians should carry naloxone to resuscitate a victim. Here is the hard and fast truth about opioid addicts. No one can make them quit using opioids until they are ready to do. If they are locked up in the jail, by default they will get clean. If they are released, the vast majority will go right back to using opioids again.

 

The Addicts Lifestyle Is Sustainable

Bumper Crop of Opioid OverdosesBumper Crop of Opioid Overdoses.  I hear people say that addicts have to hit rock bottom to realize that they need help and that may be true for some addicts. But I can tell you, the ones I have seen roaming around in Camden New Jersey and the Kensington Section of Philadelphia, look like rock bottom was last year.  As non-addicts we look at an addicts life and find very hard to understand why they don’t want to quit using opioids and get clean? We think that their lifestyle is lousy but to them it is perfectly sustainable. In most cities, there are shelters, homeless kitchens and even locations to get free clothing and a coat. These people are true urban survivalist. Some live on the streets, but others live in tents under bridges or overpasses. Some are squatting in abandoned buildings. Females may meet up with a Pimp and live with that person. She might work the street or do online escort work. The pimp furnishes the drugs, food, cigarettes and housing. The men coming to pick up the girls to get it done in the car, or a motel. Some other addicts are shoplifting and then try to sell whatever was stolen. Others are panhandling for money on the street corner. Still others are burglarizing homes in suburbia and pawn off what was stolen.

It might seem very hard to believe that an addict’s lifestyle is completely sustainable because they live in their own subculture. They forage all day long to scope out the who, what, when, where and how they are going to get the money to buy a bag. Some help one another with a bag or half a bag of dope. They sell each other loosies (loose cigarettes). They don’t usually go anywhere because they are tethered to wherever they getting the drugs. Some do actually live in the private residences with their family. Some go see their children on the weekends.

Just because it is sustainable, opioids is a cruel addiction because the longer they are on the drug, the more they need. The longer they use it, the less pleasurable is the effect. Some addicts tell me that they don’t get high. They use to just feel right and I am not certain exactly what that means other then not feeling sick. If they do not use soon, they get stressed and irritable.  A lot of addicts prefer the heroin cut with Fentanyl because its makes them very high.

Its a vicious cycle of hell because the more they use, the more the brain adapts to opioids and the more they need. So these people just keep on using opioids and performing the necessary steps to keep up with their addiction. I have often said that addicts are not lazy, because they have to work at their addiction much like we do a regular job. It takes a lot diligence to be a successful addict.

 

Opioid Addiction Can Make Some People Do Most Anything

Bumper Crop of Opioid Overdoses.  If they cannot buy the drug, then they eventually experience the very worst flu of their life. The whole effect will come crashing inward with chills, shakes, cramps, irritability, depression, anxiety, vomiting, and diarrhea. People say they feel like their skin is crawling. An opioid withdrawal can happen like nothing they have ever experienced. I hate when I am sick with a flu virus, which causes nausea and vomiting. It is perfectly understandable why people become desperate and solely focused on getting right to avoid the opioid withdraw.

I had a girlfriend who was a Nurse. She was a beautiful, bright, energetic woman with a kind heart or so I thought. She lived with me and outwardly, I never knew at first she was an opioid addict. By the time, I found out it was to late, because she had stolen and pawned off every bit precious things I had. I did finally entrap her over the telephone. I told her that I had installed cameras and recorded her stealing things from my home. She fessed up and I still charged her. The police arrested her and the case went to pretrial mitigation. She went on felony probation. Yes, I ended the relationship.

I felt like if I did not charge my ex girlfriend, that she might not ever stop using opioids. Her family had said via email that she was on methadone. I later heard that she relapsed and violated probation, which added on more years.  She stole in the vicinity of $80,000 of belongings from me and my 10 year old daughter. I am a single parent and some of the things that were left to my daughter by my wife who died from ALS and my Mom. It was really hurtful.  When someone you love, does that to you its a real violation of ethical and moral trust. I was emotionally hurt for a long time. I was more sad about her stealing from us, then the loss of the things.

 

Disease Versus Choice

Bumper Crop of Opioid Overdoses.  Did you know that the Addiction Treatment Business, is almost a $40 Billion Dollar a year business? That is how much money is coming into the addiction treatment centers in the United States. Now of course the addiction centers support that addiction is a disease. If it was not a disease, there would be no monetary reimbursements from insurance. Classifying addiction as a disease legitimizes billing out for the services rendered and the federal grants that go to the not-for-for profit centers.  Regardless if addiction is a choice or a disease, one undeniable fact is that no one can make an addict quit using drugs until they are ready to get help. I am a Registered Nurse and I have worked with plenty of addicts. I am caught in the middle as to whether addiction is a choice or a disease. I really don’t know if it is a disease or a choice. I do know that addiction does lead to other diseases.

According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse “No matter how they ingest the drug, chronic heroin users experience a variety of medical complications, including insomnia and constipation. Lung complications (including various types of pneumonia and tuberculosis) may result from the poor health of the user as well as from heroin’s effect of depressing respiration. Many experience mental disorders, such as depression and antisocial personality disorder. Men often experience sexual dysfunction and women’s menstrual cycles often become irregular. There are also specific consequences associated with different routes of administration. For example, people who repeatedly snort heroin can damage the mucosal tissues in their noses as well as perforate the nasal septum (the tissue that separates the nasal passages).

Medical consequences of chronic injection use include scarred and/or collapsed veins, bacterial infections of the blood vessels and heart valves, abscesses (boils), and other soft-tissue infections. Many of the additives in street heroin may include substances that do not readily dissolve and result in clogging the blood vessels that lead to the lungs, liver, kidneys, or brain. This can cause infection or even death of small patches of cells in vital organs. Immune reactions to these or other contaminants can cause arthritis or other rheumatologic problems.

What are the medical complications of chronic heroin use?

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/heroin/what-are-medical-complications-chronic-heroin-use

 

 

Addicts are Masters of Manipulation

An addict is a master of manipulation. If you ever confronted with the dilemma of whether you should help out an addict with money? My response is a resounding NO. Don’t ever give them money,  even they threaten to let a group of men run a train on them for 20 dollars. The reason is because the asking for more money will not ever stop. Don’t enable an addict by giving them money. They are manipulative masters at trying to guilt you into believing they are going to kill themselves. If they threaten suicide, pick up the phone, dial 911 for the police. They will be taken by EMS to the local psychiatric crisis center for evaluation. Better to be safe then sorry. Someone at the psychiatric crisis unit may be be able to influence them to enter detox and rehab.

If you have a friend or loved one who is opioid addicted, chances are they might steal right out from underneath your nose to pawn off anything for money. You might have a daughter, sister, or girlfriend who is threatening to go prostitute on the street or become an escort. Let them go and don’t give them money. If you start giving money, then you are creating a perfect storm for the day that you are pull back the enabling.  Your loved one or friend will become Michael Myers from the horror movie Halloween and rip you a new one with nasty and filthy language like you can’t believe.

If you are struggling with dealing with an Addict there is help available:

SAMHSA’s National Helpline – 1-800-662-HELP (4357)

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline

Addiction is a chronic disorder where relapse is common for addicts who are in recovery. Every addiction case is separate and distinct. For some sobriety can occur within a few months and while others struggle for more then 20 years.

In the Vietnam war, there was a widespread epidemic of marines and soldiers who were addicted to heroin. The federal government fearing the worst  that military personnel would be returning to the United States from war as addicted veterans, mandated that no one could return home without a clean urine drug screen. Those that failed the urine drug screen stayed in Vietnam until they were clean and had a negative urine drug screen. The Vietnam war is significant, because this was the first evidence that people addicted to heroin (opioids) could get clean and sober without drug treatment because none was offered.

Hold Their Feet To The Fire

Bumper Crop of Opioid Overdoses. Do you really want to struggle with an addicts addiction until it destroys your health and wellbeing?  Don’t feel sorry for these people so much so that your own mental and physical health is affected. If they come asking for help, then by all means assist them if you can. If they are playing you out then send them out the door. If they refuse to leave, then call the police. Dealing with an addict can wreck your life. Don’t let their addiction destroy your mental and physical wellbeing.

As you have read earlier, the marines and soldiers in the Vietnam War overcame opioid addiction with no treatment. Fortunately today there is treatment available such as Methadone, Suboxone, Subutex, Vivitrol Injection, 5 to 7 day detox, inpatient rehabilitation and outpatient. Help is available if the person is committed to get clean and sober. A person with an opioid addiction must have a burning desire to get off the drugs.

Check out our website: www.HTRSD.ORG

 

Understanding Addiction: https://htrsd.org/courses/understanding-addiction-new/