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Human Trafficking Response and Social Disparities Training
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Human trafficking information: 11 facts you should know. Human trafficking information that is accurate and informative is one of the most powerful tools available for fighting what has for too long been a shadowy and poorly understood phenomenon. Dosomething.org, an organization dedicated to helping young people become active in fighting social ills across the United States, has created a short but powerful article sharing 11 Facts About Human Trafficking. It includes exactly the kind of information that, if more people know about it, just might help make a difference in how successfully the public-at-large can be a active factor in helping to diminish instances of human trafficking, sex trafficking, and forced labor in America. Although it’s a very quick read, the article does a great job of sharing human trafficking information most people may not be aware of.

Human trafficking is a crime that forcefully exploits women, men, and children. According to the United Nations, human trafficking affects every country in the world, but it’s not talked about enough. So we’re talking about it. Read on to learn more about human trafficking, and find support resources and ways you can take action at the Polaris Project, Love146, and Free the Slaves.

  1. Trafficking involves transporting someone into a situation of exploitation. This can include forced labor, marriage, prostitution, and organ removal. This kind of exploitation is known by a few different names — “human trafficking,” “trafficking of persons,” and “modern slavery” are the ones accepted by the US Department of State. [1]
  2. It’s estimated that internationally there are between 20 million and 40 million people in modern slavery today. Assessing the full scope of human trafficking is difficult because so cases so often go undetected, something the United Nations refers to as “the hidden figure of crime.”[2]
  3. Estimates suggest that, internationally, only about .04% survivors of human trafficking cases are identified, meaning that the vast majority of cases of human trafficking go undetected. [3]

Read more at dosomething.org

Human TraffickingLink to our course on Human Trafficking Response