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War on Drugs Leads to Forced Enema

War on Drugs Leads to Forced Enema

War On Drugs Leads to Forced Enema

Deming, New Mexico Police Chief

War On Drugs Leads to Forced Enema. This is no sick joke and really happened to this poor bloke in City of Deming located in Hildago County, New Mexico. Police stopped David Eckert, age 54 and suspected him of carrying drugs inside his rectum. Police handcuffed, obtained a warrant from Luna County and took Eckert to hospital number one, which refused. So Police drove outside of Luna County, 50 miles to hospital number two, Gila Regional Medical Center, which is located in Grant County. There at Gila Medical Center, the physicians and nurse carried out these heinous procedures.

Eckert ended up with a $1.6 Million Dollars settlement from the City and County. In truth, that is not even enough money for the absolute horror, disgust, humiliation and brutality that Eckert endured.  It should have been $16 Million Dollars.

 

Hospital Billed Eckert $6,000.00 for unconsented procedures

War on Drugs Leads to Forced EnemaWar on Drugs Leads to Forced Enema. The police then drove Eckert 50 miles to the emergency room of the Gila Regional Medical Center, where doctors took X-rays of Eckert’s abdomen and performed a rectal examination. No drugs were found, so doctors performed a second rectal exam, again unavailing.

Doctors then gave Eckert an enema and forced him to have a bowel movement in the presence of a nurse and policeman, according to a lawsuit that Eckert filed. When no narcotics were found, a second enema was administered. Then a third.
The police left the privacy curtain open, so that Eckert’s searches were public, the lawsuit says.
After hours of fruitless searches, police and doctors arranged another X-ray and finally anesthetized Eckert and performed a colonoscopy.
“Nothing was found inside of Mr. Eckert,” the police report notes. So after he woke up, he was released — after 13 hours, two rectal exams, three enemas, two X-rays and a colonoscopy.

New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/26/opinion/sunday/kristof-3-enemas-later-still-no-drugs.html

 

War on Drugs Leads to Forced Enema

Eckert, continuously protested and did not consent, to the following.

War on Drugs Leads to Forced Enema

  • 2 x-rays – no narcotics found
  • 2 digital rectal exams – no narcotics found
  • 3 forced enemas – no narcotics found in feces
  • Colonoscopy under sedation – no narcotics found
  • The hospital sent Eckert a $6,000 bill.

 

Syracuse cops push St. Joe’s to probe man’s rectum for drugs; ‘What country are we living in?’

Video: https://www.syracuse.com/crime/2018/12/syracuse-cops-push-st-joes-to-probe-mans-rectum-for-drugs-what-country-are-we-living-in.html

To learn more about what is wrong with this misguided society: https://htrsd.org/

Addressing disparities in healthcare

Addressing disparities in healthcare

Addressing disparities in healthcare. All people should have access to good healthcare. Addressing disparities in healthcare requires going beyond the simple provision of medical services towards understanding how societal, cultural and economic forces affect different patient populations. The Kaiser Family Foundation provides an excellent overview that answers five key questions about health disparities overall, and a consideration of addressing disparities in healthcare effectively.

Many groups are at disproportionate risk of being uninsured, lacking access to care, and experiencing worse health outcomes. For example, people of color and low-income individuals are more likely to be uninsured, face barriers to accessing care, and have higher rates of certain conditions compared to Whites and those at higher incomes.

Disparities in health and health care not only affect the groups facing disparities, but also limit overall gains in quality of care and health for the broader population and result in unnecessary costs. Addressing health disparities is increasingly important as the population becomes more diverse.

Many groups are at disproportionate risk of being uninsured, lacking access to care, and experiencing worse health outcomes. For example, people of color and low-income individuals are more likely to be uninsured, face barriers to accessing care, and have higher rates of certain conditions compared to Whites and those at higher incomes.

Read more at kff.org

Healthcare Disparities Among Prenatal PatientsLink to our course on Healthcare Disparities Among Prenatal Patients

Social justice in health disparities

Social justice in health disparities

Social justice in health disparities. The academic view of Social justice in health disparities is a topic of growing prominence. The President and CEO Darrell Kirch, MD  for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), offers some interesting insights on the values that guide academic medicine.

Change is a constant in life, both personally and professionally. Sometimes, though, changes feel so disruptive that we may fundamentally question who we are and where we are heading. Today, as we face great uncertainty created by tumultuous change in health care and society at large, a set of core beliefs can help us remain true to our values and missions even as we are buffeted by conflicting forces. In academic medicine, we have a set of enduring truths that have been a guiding force since the establishment of the AAMC nearly 150 years ago. Arguably, some beliefs have existed from the time of Hippocrates.

For my last column as AAMC president and CEO, I want to highlight some of the universal professional touchstones I gleaned from having had the remarkable privilege of visiting students and faculty at every AAMC-member school. Regardless of the size of your institution, your area of specialization, or your location, these enduring truths can buoy us, providing guidance during troubling or disruptive times. They remind us of what drew us to academic medicine in the first place.

Read more at news.aamc.org

Racism in Nursing: An Under-Addressed ProblemLink to our course on Racism in Nursing: An Under-Addressed Problem